[NTLK] Internal WiFi Project

Sebastian Sparrer mailinglists at sparrer-online.de
Thu Jan 7 16:45:24 EST 2016


Hi there,

for most of the time I am just a passive reader of this list. But now I 
feel I can maybe finally contribute something.

I am working for LPKF, a prototyping solution and laser systems 
manufacturer based in Germany. We do offer manual pick-and-place 
equipment, PCB prototyping equipment, we can cut SMT stencils and we can 
do antennas on plastics. Let me explain:

For example, one of our business units is manufacturing laser cutting 
systems for cutting SMT stencils out of stainless steel sheets. I have 
good connections to the guys and could contribute a few laser cut SMT 
stencils free of charge.

The division I am involved with has developed a process for plating a 
metal surface onto plastics. This was a bug success in the smartphone 
market as the manufacturers could use plastic components such as the 
back cover of the phone, to embedd the numerous cell-, BT-, WiFi-, GPS-, 
NFC-, whathaveyou antennas. If we could find someone to injection-mold 
the nicely designed cover cap using LDS-grade plastics, this part could 
also be used as the real WiFi Antenna.

Another idea which is bugging me for some years already may extend this 
project even further. You know, there is no real replacement for the 
original rechargeable battery packs. Yeah, you can rework them. Or you 
can use the battery-cell tray - which we probably all do.
Now, my idea is to design a replacement battery holder and use the 
afforementioned technology to integrate the circuitry into the holder 
itself. Now, by using smaller cells we could probably create enough 
space to combine Jakes project into it and fit the battery cells, the 
WiFi PCB and the antenna onto the same unit! This would require a 
modification of the Newton to have an interface for connecting the 
WiFi/Battery tray to the internals though. And it is certainly on a 
level which can't be done by some enthusiasts over the course of a 
weekend or so.

Let me know if any of this could be beneficial for this project.

Best regards,

Sebastian


Am 03.01.16 um 20:34 schrieb Jake Bordens:
> I'm glad folks are interested in doing a run of these.  A few thoughts.
>
> - I made my boards at itead.cc.  They're under 5cm x 5cm and I'm happy to send the exact zip file that I used to get the boards made if it will help.  There are plenty of places to get low-quantity boards made at an affordable price.
>
> - I assembled 3 of these by hand over the course of the project.  I'd have to say that it was stressful because of the placement of the small SMT components by hand.  Each time it came out of my reflow toaster oven, I was surprised that it actually worked.  Real pick and place tools would probably help in this regard
>
> - I used a stencil made at oshstencils.com to apply the solder paste.  I wound up using a light adhesive spray to stick the stencil to the board and apply the solder paste with a flat scraper.  I know that this isn't the way that you're supposed to do it, but it is what made the best application of solder paste for me without smudging.
>
> - For those who may be wondering, its best that these are assembled outside of the USA and shipped to folks that are interested in them.  The modules are classified as 5A002A.1, and I'm unclear of the export regulations.  I actually emailed someone government export expert to ask what's allowed, but it'd be better if they're assembled outside the USA without being encumbered by US encryption law.  Regardless, it is something I don't want to get involved with and risk an infraction.
>
> - You'll want to get some antennas as well.  I used a 960-FXP75070045B which is the smallest antenna I could find, and I don't really think it is meant for Bluetooth though.  960-FXP840.07.0055B is slightly larger, and is intended for WiFi.  They also sell a ConnectOne module with an on-board chip antenna.  I haven't tried one of those.  The inside of the case is coated with a metallic coating, so it makes antenna placement tricky, but it may be close enough to the top edge of the case, which is not shielded in the area of the dock connector and power port.
>
> Jake
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 1/2/16, 2:48 PM, "newtontalk-bounces at newtontalk.net on behalf of Matthias Melcher" <newtontalk-bounces at newtontalk.net on behalf of mm at matthiasm.com> wrote:
>
>>> On Dec 22, 2015, at 11:29 PM, Jake Bordens <jake at allaboutjake.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Its the end of the year, and I wanted to wrap up some loose ends on the Internal WiFi project.
>>>
>>> First, I created a new "port cover" that works with the WiFi board installed.  See the picture here:
>>>
>>> 	http://retronewton.blogspot.com/2015/12/3d-printed-port-cover.html
>>>
>>> Second, I posted all of the files to GitHub, including the PCB design, the Newton PKG and source code, and the 3D models of the port cover:
>>>
>>> 	https://github.com/jake-b/Newton-Internal-WiFi
>>>
>>> There's also a model of the original (unmodified) port cover part that you can print if you need one.  (You'll want to add supports so that the tabs print correctly)
>> Thanks, Jake! This is great news.
>>
>> Is the Eagle board two or four layers?
>>
>> I have put most of the components into my Arrow account and it comes to around 50 Euros in Europe. The PCB price depends heavily on the number of boards ordered. I have access to a pick and place machine, but I would still need an oven.
>>
>> Is there anyone interested in a fully assembled module in Europe?
>>
>> - Matthias
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
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